My Life in T-Shirts

Two of the drawers the hold some of my dozens of T-shirts.
Two of the drawers that hold some of my dozens of T-shirts.

I suspect that most people acquire T-shirts at a special events,  rarely wear them, and eventually donate or discard them.  Not me.  I was blessed with a job where dress didn’t matter much, so was even able to wear T-shirts throughout most of my professional career. Because of that, I actually wear out most of the shirts I get.  However, it does seem that I can afford to thin my collection, now.

Like most mundane objects in life, there is a story attached to each one of these.  This is likely to get long as more pictures are added over time; feel free to skip this entry.

Park City
This is a shirt from Park City, UT.  My girlfriend at the time, Merrianne, went there with her family, and got me this shirt.  (We have been happily married since 1989.)  This is one of only two shirts that a woman ever sent me – the other a long gone shirt that said “Bun-Zai,” from a friend named RoAnn in 1980.
People's Teahouse
This shirt was designed for the People’s Teahouse at Stanford by (I think) Vae Sun, circa 1979.  The Teahouse was a converted supply room that sold Ramen, Dim Sum, Tea, and Soda each evening, to raise money for Asian American causes.  A cha siu bao cost 25¢, as did a 12-ounce can of soda, or small pot of tea. It was staffed by volunteers, of which I was one.  On the top of the circular logo are the last names of the managers – Chin, Morton, Toy, Wong, and Wong.  On the bottom are the coming year’s managers – Hoi, Jang, Jeong, Kasumi, and Matsumoto.
LOTS
At Stanford, the computer center called the Low Overhead Timesharing System was a big part of my life.  It was a DecSystem 2060, with an incredible 512k of memory, shared by over 4000 users.  It had less computing power than a cell phone you could buy today.  I volunteered there for many years, and in my final year was Student Coordinator, a paid position.  I designed this as the first LOTS T-shirt in 1979.  It was an entirely manual process, involving rub-on letters for the words, and drawing the picture by hand on a sheet of paper.  I then took the drawings to a T-shirt shop (by bus – I had no car), where they made silkscreens of the design, and printed up shirts.  These sold for $5 a piece.  The second printing of this shirt was orange, with black letters.  The computer science department later leveraged my drawing to make a shirt of their own, I was told.  On the back is a depiction of an ADM-3 terminal, with the infamous error message that the computer gave when it crashed: “%DECSYSTEM-20 NOT RUNNING”
This shirt from around 1983 was adapted from an animated graphic drawn by Carol Bassett at the time.  The HP2700 High Performance Graphics Terminal only sold about 50 units over its lifetime, due to its price of about $25,000.
This shirt from around 1983 was adapted from an animated graphic drawn by Carol Bassett. The HP2700 High Performance Graphics Terminal (code-named Orion) only sold about 50 units over its lifetime, due to its price tag of about $25,000. I never actually worked on the 2700, but worked on its follow-on called Pulsar, which would have expanded the display dimensions to 1024 x 768 pixels. That product never saw the light of day.
Univega shirt, purchased around 1985 or so.  My first bike at college was a Columbia 3-speed.  I sold that for $20 in my junior year, and got a Univega Viva Sport for almost $200.  It was colored Scarlet Pearl, and thus I named it "Pearl."  It was the only bike I owned that ever had a name.  I rode that bike all over town, never locking it for decades, until it was finally stolen off the HP Cupertino campus in 2010.  The shirt above was once the closest thing I had to a plain white T-shirt, so I used it under dress shirts on occasion.
Univega shirt, purchased around 1985 or so. My first bike at college was a Columbia 3-speed. I sold that for $20 in my junior year, and got a Univega Viva Sport for almost $200. It was colored Scarlet Pearl, and thus I named it “Pearl.” It was the only bike I owned that ever had a name. I rode that bike all over town, never locking it for decades, until it was finally stolen off the HP Cupertino campus in 2010. The shirt above was once the closest thing I had to a plain white T-shirt, so I used it under dress shirts on occasion.
The first organized ride I ever did was Century '84, the Ride to the Pinnacles.  It was 200 miles, 100 down, camping overnight, and 200 back.  This was a fundraiser for the American Lung Association, one of my causes since I had childhood asthma.  The staff on that ride was amazing.  I still remember Paige.
The first organized ride I ever did was Century ’84, the Ride to the Pinnacles. It was 200 miles, 100 down, camping overnight, and 200 back. This was a fundraiser for the American Lung Association, one of my causes since I had childhood asthma. The staff on that ride was amazing. I still remember Paige.
Every year, a group of Hawaii students and their friends put on a luau with food and entertainment at Stanford.  It was a huge deal, attended by hundreds.  This shirt, drawn by Moon Ki Chai, says "Stanford Luau Hui" on the front, and "Work, Study, Get Rich, Go Beach" on the back (the first 3 terms were a tongue-in-cheek Stanford chant).  The back also featured a map of the Hawaiian Islands, with the continental US shoved into the little inset where Hawaii often is on a map.
Every year, a group of Hawaii students and their friends put on a luau with food and entertainment at Stanford. It was a huge deal, attended by hundreds. This shirt, drawn by Moon Ki Chai, says “Stanford Luau Hui” on the front, and “Work, Study, Get Rich, Go Beach” on the back (the first 3 terms were a tongue-in-cheek Stanford chant). The back also featured a map of the Hawaiian Islands, with the continental US relegated to the little inset where Hawaii often is on a map.
Restaurant near Disneyland
On our first trip to Disneyland with the kids, we stayed at the Lamplighter Motel. Near there, was a Malaysian restaurant. “Got Milk?” was a contemporary advertising jingle, and I couldn’t resist the take on it.
Odyssey of the Mind
I used to volunteer as a judge for various school activities such as science fairs, even before we had children. This shirt was from Odyssey of the Mind, a hybrid between an engineering fair and drama event. It used to be called Olympics of the Mind, but the Olympic people got upset at that. The name was later changed to Destination Imagination. In the competition, we would see things like 20-gram Balsa wood structures that could support a thousand pounds.
Destination Imagination Flat Cat
This is a shirt from when the competition was renamed Destination Imagination. I suspect many people never again wore the Flat Cat shirt after the competition, but it became part of my regular wardrobe, as did most T-shirts.
Kalani High Band Jacket
Technically, this Kalani High Band Jacket is not a T-shirt. I played Alto Sax from 7th grade through the final year of my Master’s. In my 3 years of High School, I was always in the marching band. We had an opportunity at one point to order jackets, and there was an option to add a lining to what would otherwise just be a plastic windbreaker. I remember in my freshman year of college, some of us went down to a the house of a classmate (Cathy Shimizu, now Haas) for Thanksgiving. When we were headed out to Disneyland, I was going to wear this jacket, but her father offered a heavier coat. Good thing I took it – it was cold and windy at Disneyland. In the pocket of this jacket, I found a stack of napkins. Possibly some of those were from Stanford food service, many decades ago. I would take one napkin at each meal, but generally save it in my pocket rather than use it. That way, I didn’t have to buy Kleenex. I don’t think I used this jacket much after Freshman year, because it was too light.

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